Feature @IPilogue Post: ‘Making the @CBCRadioCanada’s Giant Castle More User-Friendly’

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Feature @IPilogue Post: ‘Making the @CBCRadioCanada’s Giant Castle More User-Friendly’

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“The culture industries appear to be at a crossroads. Shifting advertising practices as well as audience viewing and consumption habits continue to contribute to new challenges and opportunities for media and entertainment providers throughout the world. With its new “A Space for All of Us” strategy, Canada’s national public broadcaster – the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation/Radio-Canada (CBC/Radio-Canada) – is facing hard choices while looking to rethink how the Corporation serves Canadians in an increasingly digitized information and entertainment landscape. By opening up CBC/Radio-Canada to the people that it’s mandated to serve, Canada’s national public broadcaster can reaffirm and build off of the Corporation’s impressive legacy by contributing to the country’s cultural consciousness.”

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New @IPilogue post: ‘Alice Corp., Software Patents, and Lighting the Rabbit Hole of Abstract Ideas’

“It’s often hard to recognize the evolving nature of legal regimes amidst the fast-paced and so-called revolutionary social and technological changes facilitated by digital and networked technologies. Laws, norms, and conventions developed over centuries are being problematized and rethought as new social, technological, and economic realities emerge. Computer software, a technology that’s mainstream adoption is but some three decades old, is arguably challenging the contours of patent regimes, which the innovation and economies of many states are built upon. The Supreme Court of the United States’ (SCOTUS) recent decision in the case of Alice Corp. Pty. Ltd. v. CLS Bank International, et al has moved the United States’ legal system one step closer to accounting for new, digitally-based business practices.”

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New @IPilogue Post: ‘Canadian Digital Copyright’s Second Decade: What’s at Stake’

“For the first time in some twenty years, Canada’s copyright law framework is set for the foreseeable future. Previous attempts (in 2005, 2008, and 2010) to update the country’s copyright legislation for contemporary realities were stalled or aborted due to the problematics of successive minority governments during the mid-2000s. After attaining a parliamentary majority in 2011, the governing Conservative Party’s Copyright Modernization Act (Bill C-11) received Royal Assent on 29 June 2012. This followed a series of Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) copyright decisions between 2002 and 2012, which together form the basis of Canada’s copyright framework moving forward. However, with mandated five-year reviews of copyright law included in Section 58 of Bill-C11 (see s 92 of the Copyright Act), debates surrounding the current and future shape of Canada’s copyright regime are destined to continue in the coming years.”

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New @IPilogue Post: ‘The Future of Copyright in a Global Context’

“This past March, Toronto hosted the 55th Annual Convention of the International Studies Association (ISA). This year’s ISA Annual Convention brought together over 5300 scholars, practitioners, and students to discuss “Geopolitics in an Era of Globalization”. As intellectual property-based industries become increasingly implicated in global economic, social, cultural, and political discussions, copyright issues are becoming more complicated and contested.”

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Feature @IPilogue Post: ‘The Future of Rights: Intellectual Property, Economic Inequality, and the ‘Digital Divide”

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“A quarter century since he helped to create it, the man widely regarded as the creator of the World Wide Web, Tim Berners-Lee, has renewed calls for a Digital Bill of Rights to help preserve the open and innovative character of his invention and to protect human rights in the so-called digital age.”

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