My Latest: Review of ‘Innovation & Intellectual Property: Collaborative Dynamics in Africa’

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My Latest: Review of ‘Innovation & Intellectual Property: Collaborative Dynamics in Africa’

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“The ambitious volume INNOVATION & INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY is edited by members of the Open African Innovation and Research Training Project (Open A.I.R. Project) who are law professors and researchers based in Canada and South Africa. The Open A.I.R. Project is a “pan-African and globally interconnected research and training network” (p. v) focused on raising awareness about Intellectual Property (IP) in African settings, empowering an IP-oriented community in Africa, and identifying and analyzing IP-related problems and opportunities for collaboration and innovation. This volume and its sister report, KNOWLEDGE AND INNOVATION IN AFRICA (see below for link) , as well as the Open A.I.R Project more generally will be of interest to IP scholars, practitioners, and policymakers interested in the role IP and alternative knowledge management practices can play to facilitate collaborative innovation in Africa, other developing state contexts, and the evolving knowledge-based economy.”

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Footnote – Shirin Elahi and Jeremy de Beer with Dick Kawooya, Chidi Oguamanam, Nagla Rizk and the Open A.I.R. Network, KNOWLEDGE AND INNOVATION IN AFRICA: SCENARIOS FOR THE FUTURE (The Open A.I.R. Project, 2013).

Feature @IPilogue Post: “‘Made in America’ 2015? The TPP and the Future of Canada’s Digital Economy”

TPP-Special-Issue

“The Trans-Pacific Partnership (“TPP”) agreement pages of both the Office of the United States Trade Representative and the White House display an understandable, if not provocative, logo extolling that the trade deal is “Made in America”. For a trade deal whose negotiations spanned the length of President Obama’s term in office, this is hardly surprising: with the end of his Administration on the horizon, the President is seeking to galvanize public and political support for an initiative he has long championed. However, in the context of a deal said to “set the rules for the 21st century for trade” between 12 countries of differing levels of economic development, such a US-centric system should raise some concern. In the case of Canada and more specifically Canadian copyright law, the TPP’s merits must be measured according to the domestic needs and realities of the country’s existing industries as well as its maturing digital economy. The Government of Canada should ensure that flexibilities and exceptions available in the TPP are creatively employed to mitigate concessions made to trading partners, which international trade agreements necessarily entail.”

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IPOsgoode @IPilogue Post: ‘A Tidal Shift for the Digital Economy?’

“A decade and a half since music industry titans like the rock group Metallica launched legal action to shut down the largest (unauthorized) distributor of recorded content, the ways that fans and audiophiles are able to access music and other cultural resources appear, once again, to be in flux. 2015 has already seen the headline-grabbing launches of two new music streaming services backed by major players with deep pockets: Tidal, spearheaded by recording artist and serial entrepreneur Jay Z; and Apple Music, the revamped music service offered by the world’s most valuable company. These services are set to compete with the streaming music sector’s dominant player, Spotify, and a host of others and, in doing so, may serve as an indication of where the broader digital economy is heading as it continues to evolve.” 

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New @IPilogue Post: ‘Intellectual Property, Politicians, and the Press: Who’s Protecting the Public Good?’

“It’s hardly surprising that politicians and members of the press often find themselves at odds with one another, as the two have a long history of conflicting priorities and mandates. Yet the two entities occupy complementary and at times oppositional roles in serving the public good. The recent debate surrounding leaked information about possible copyright reforms brings this tension to the surface. It also raises the question of who is left to serve the public interest when politicians and the Press openly conflict.”

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New @IPilogue Post: ‘Users’ Rights and Realities: CCH, Fair Dealing, and the Experiences at Canadian Cultural Institutions’

“Recent research is shining a new light onto the Supreme Court of Canada’s (SCC) decision that is said to have ‘reconceptualized’ fair dealing as an integral part of copyright law in Canada (Craig, p. 449). During a 29 September 2014 lecture in the IPOsgoode Speaks Series, Dr. Emily Hudson, the Career Development Fellow in Intellectual Property Law at the Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre at the University of Oxford, questioned the prevailing legal and academic perceptions of the CCH Canadian Ltd. v. Law Society of Upper Canada (2004 SCC 13) judgment in a research presentation entitled: ‘Copyright Exceptions as Users’ Rights? An Empirical Critique’.”

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