Joseph F. Turcotte, PhD

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Monthly Archives: October 2016

New Report: ‘Maximizing Opportunity, Mitigating Risk’ for Work-Integrated Learning in Ontario

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I’m pleased to announce that our new report has been published by the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO).

As per the HEQCO website:

the report, “Maximizing Opportunity, Mitigating Risk: Aligning Law, Policy and Practice to Strengthen Work-Integrated Learning in Ontario, identifies seven areas for institutions and policy makers to focus on: employment standards, health and safety, human rights, intellectual property, employment insurance, immigration law and tax expenditures. The study found that while only a small number of cases result in litigation, campus leaders and legal representatives are becoming increasingly preoccupied interpreting unclear laws and regulation, mediating disputes and negotiating agreements to address this growing and changing area of postsecondary education.

A short, Stakeholders Summary can be accessed here and the full report, including an executive summary, can be accessed here.

Further information can be found here.

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My Latest: Review of ‘Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism’

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“The popular imaginary surrounding the digital, knowledge-based economy (DKE) largely consists of celebratory appraisals of an unfolding political-economic situation based on the “creative destruction” of existing economic and social practices facilitated by the informationalization of previously uncommodified aspects of human existence and social life. From the digital innovation capitals of Western “developed” states, a purportedly universal ethos of technologically facilitated economic growth and human developmentis diffused outward, as transnational financial,trade, and consumer markets are reorganized according to the efficiency gains offered by scalable networked information and communication technologies (ICTs). Creative classes (Florida, 2014), creative economies (UNESCO/UNDP, 2013), and so-called platform economics (Evans, 2011) are celebrated for their purportedly liberating and democratizing effects. Yet, some twenty years afterthe “digital economy” (Tapscott,1996; see also Bell,1976) was first announced and nearly a decade since the “Great Recession,” the global economy itself and the economic prospects of a number of states remain mired in stagnant growth—or worse. In this context, critical scholarship focused on this particular version of the DKE, which had largely been overshadowed in the late 1990s and early 2000s, has received renewed attention and is providing theoretical lenses for analyzing the claims made by techno-optimists as well as the actions taken by businesses, governments, and international organizations seeking to investin and benefitfrom transforming political-economic structurations (cf. Fuchs & Winseck, 2011; Huws, 2015; Morozov, 2013; Ouellet, 2010; Parayil, 2005). The theoretical lens of “informational capitalism” (Fuchs, 2010; Kundnani, 1999) helps foreground concerns about inequitableDKE-based arrangements, highlighting how (and why) knowledge-based resources are converted into informational commodities, which are then marketed and exchanged in transnational trade-based networks, without necessarily benefiting the producers or consumers of these goods and services”

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